Archive for November, 2009

Why Grandma Should Get Online

Monday, November 30th, 2009

Why Grandma Should Get Online
Grandma doesn’t spend much time online — but she would be better off if she did, researchers agree.

Seniors on the Internet

Seniors on the Internet


Some 92 percent of Americans ages 18-29 are online (meaning they admit to using the Internet and e-mail at least occasionally), according to the Pew Internet and American Life Project. The rate falls modestly to 87 percent for those ages 30-49, and somewhat more steeply to 79 percent to those ages 50-64. But for those 65 and older the rate falls of a cliff, to 42 percent.

But a recent study by the Phoenix Center for Advanced Legal & Economic Public Policy Studies, a non-profit think-tank in Washington, DC, indicates that spending time online cuts the incidence of depression among senior citizens by at least 20 percent. The results were based on surveys of 7,000 people age 55 and older who were retired and not working, but not living in nursing homes.

“Increased Internet access and use by senior citizens enables them to connect with sources of social support when face-to-face interaction becomes more difficult,” said study co-author Sherry G. Ford, a professor at the University of Montevallo in Montevallo, Alabama. Hence, they are less susceptible to depression.

SOURCE: .foxnews.com

Click here to read the Fox News Article

What are Old People For?

Monday, November 30th, 2009

Dr. Bill Thomas speaking at NYU’s Gallatin School, June 11, 2009

The answer to that question takes us very deep into the broad stream of human experience. Aging is intrinsic to our humanity, part and parcel to our human nature. Yet our society is obsessed with denying and delaying the aging process.

Come with me to explore why our society in particular has forgotten What Old People Are For.”

What Are Old People For? from Kavan Peterson on Vimeo.

What are Old People for?

“It’s Never Too Late” Computer Labs IN2L

Sunday, November 29th, 2009

Send an email to your grandson? Visit the Vatican in Rome? Receive an email from your son in Kentucky? Play euchre on-line? Your granddaughter just had a baby girl and you received the picture just hours after her birth….is this possible? The answer to all is yes, with the assistance of “It’s Never Too Late” (IN2L) adaptive computer system found at the ILS center. This computer has a touch screen which enables the participant the enjoyment of everything a computer offers, without the confusion of mastering the keyboard and mouse.

It's Never to Late Computer

It's Never to Late Computer

ILS has found the benefits of the computer system to be many to the seniors. One of the greatest benefits is being able to keep the elderly in communication with family near and far. It also allows elders to use their creativity using programs such as the greeting card creation program or the painting program. Flight simulator, driving simulator and even an exercise cycle simulator can be used on the computer! The computer is connected to the internet allowing virtual access to almost anything and anywhere. The IN2L computer lab provides a lifelong learning opportunity for the elderly. Whether playing word games on-line, playing Jeopardy, writing emails to family and friends or doing genealogy research, the computer lab has something all can enjoy.

SOURCE: independentlivingforseniors.org

Click here to read the article

Eden Alternative

Thursday, November 26th, 2009

The Eden Alternative is an international not-for-profit organization dedicated to transforming care environments into habitats for human beings that promote quality of life for all involved. It is a powerful tool for inspiring well-being for Elders and those who collaborate with them as Care Partners.

The Eden Alternative’s principle-based philosophy empowers Care Partners to transform institutional approaches to care into the creation of a community where life is worth living. Led by our internationally-recognized founder, Dr. William Thomas, we apply our 15 years of experience to guiding organizations through the journey of culture change.

Our Vision: To eliminate loneliness, helplessness, and boredom.

Our Mission: Improving the lives of the Elder and their Care Partners by transforming the communities where they live and work.
1. The three plagues of loneliness, helplessness, and boredom account for the bulk of suffering among our Elders.

2. An Elder-centered community commits to creating a human habitat where life revolves around close and continuing contact with plants, animals, and children. It is these relationships that provide the young and old alike with a pathway to a life worth living.

3. Loving companionship is the antidote to loneliness. Elders deserve easy access to human and animal companionship.

4. An Elder-centered community creates opportunity to give as well as receive care. This is the antidote to helplessness.

5. An Elder-centered community imbues daily life with variety and spontaneity by creating an environment in which unexpected and unpredictable interactions and happenings can take place. This is the antidote to boredom.

6. Meaningless activity corrodes the human spirit. The opportunity to do things that we find meaningful is essential to human health.

7. Medical treatment should be the servant of genuine human caring, never its master.

8. An Elder-centered community honors its Elders by de-emphasizing top-down bureaucratic authority, seeking instead to place the maximum possible decision-making authority into the hands of the Elders or into the hands of those closest to them.

9. Creating an Elder-centered community is a never-ending process. Human growth must never be separated from human life.

10. Wise leadership is the lifeblood of any struggle against the three plagues. For it, there can be no substitute.

SOURCE: edenalt.org

Visit the Eden Alternative Web Site

Eden Alternative Founder Starts Greenhouse Project

Thursday, November 26th, 2009

Dr. William H. Thomas, founder of the Eden Alternative approach to long-term care, has created a new initiative to “reinvent the long-term care environment for the 21st Century.” The project gives providers, consumers, gerontologists, students and policymakers an important new opportunity to have their voices heard in its creation. “The facility-based approach to care we use today is far better than it used to be but has significant, built-in limitations,” Thomas said. “With the help and input from many others, we are going to pioneer a collaborative model that is warmer, smarter and greener than what we have today.” On September 22 in Washington, D.C., Dr. Thomas and a distinguished panel briefed Senator Grassley and the Special Committee on Aging on the project.

Dr. Thomas is inviting the participation of all those with a vested interest in seeing the long-term care environment transformed to participate in an online discussion forum. The collaboration area, which can be found at http://www.thegreenhouseproject.org, will remain available to participants. To register as a participant, click on the link above.

None of the prevailing models of long-term care delivery were launched on the basis of a single, comprehensive document. The Green House Charter will be developed by a worldwide collaborative that includes health care professionals, designers, consumers, advocates, regulators, government officials, students and faculty. The document will be developed over a very intense nine-month planning process. We have chosen to work as a voluntary design collaborative, with the guarantee that the material we develop as a result of this project be made available for free to all people who might like to use it. Success is going to depend upon bringing a large number of interested people together for an intense period of collaboration. The results will be used to develop a new paradigm and working models for our society, with practical recommendations for their implementation.

Dr. William H. Thomas, founder of the Eden Alternative approach to long-term care, has created a new initiative to “reinvent the long-term care environment for the 21st Century.” The project gives providers, consumers, gerontologists, students and policymakers an important new opportunity to have their voices heard in its creation. “The facility-based approach to care we use today is far better than it used to be but has significant, built-in limitations,” Thomas said. “With the help and input from many others, we are going to pioneer a collaborative model that is warmer, smarter and greener than what we have today.” On September 22 in Washington, D.C., Dr. Thomas and a distinguished panel briefed Senator Grassley and the Special Committee on Aging on the project.

Dr. Thomas is inviting the participation of all those with a vested interest in seeing the long-term care environment transformed to participate in an online discussion forum. The collaboration area, which can be found at http://www.thegreenhouseproject.org, will remain available to participants. To register as a participant, click on the link above.

None of the prevailing models of long-term care delivery were launched on the basis of a single, comprehensive document. The Green House Charter will be developed by a worldwide collaborative that includes health care professionals, designers, consumers, advocates, regulators, government officials, students and faculty. The document will be developed over a very intense nine-month planning process. We have chosen to work as a voluntary design collaborative, with the guarantee that the material we develop as a result of this project be made available for free to all people who might like to use it. Success is going to depend upon bringing a large number of interested people together for an intense period of collaboration. The results will be used to develop a new paradigm and working models for our society, with practical recommendations for their implementation.

SOURCE: elderweb.com

Click here to read article